Parenting

Sweaty, Smelly Teens and Tweens: How to Stop the Sweat

There comes a certain age when our kids start to smell and sweat like teens.  For most adolescents, this is a temporary phase that will improve with age.  A few will struggle with hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating) and osmidrosis (foul-smelling sweat)  for their whole lives.  Don’t worry-- with just a few tricks and the right antiperspirant, you can help your child control that sweaty smell all day long.  
 
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Do You Know What Is Coming into Your Youth’s Phone?

It is 11:30 P.M on a Thursday night.  Your 13-year-old daughter is asleep.  Suddenly she awakes to a ding from her phone.

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Car Seat Until Age 8? Who Actually Follows this Recommendation?

I’ll admit it– when it comes to car seats, I just can’t practice everything I preach.

As a pediatrician I recommend that kids stay in a five-point restraint car seat until age 8, in accordance with the research-supported guidelines of the American Academy of Pediatrics. When you finally graduate from a car seat you’re still supposed to stay in a booster seat until you’re 12 years old or 4 feet 9 inches.

As a mom, I’ve never actually met anyone following these recommendations. If you are following them, please comment below and let us know how you’re doing it.

Here’s the official carseat and booster seat guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics:

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The Namby Pamby Effect: Are Our Kids Growing Up Soft and Confused?

When Jacob was four years old, he earned his first, shiny trophy, courtesy of participation in a nearby t-ball league. As he grew older, trophies, plaques, and medals for participation started piling up in his closet. One day, he even received a trophy for attending a friend’s birthday party. In 3rd grade, Jacob earned his first trip to the principal’s office for bad behavior, and was given a lower level referral (formerly known as a demerit). Moderate or higher level referrals didn’t exist. By the time he reached middle school, he learned that as long as he kept his referrals under ten for the year, his parents would not be contacted by the school. Meanwhile, despite putting little effort (at home or school) into his schoolwork, he slid by with mostly B’s and C’s courtesy of the well-documented trend of grade inflation. He and his classmates quickly learned that they could get into the online grading system and figure which assignments counted, and which were worth few or no points at all. They quickly became experts on how to slide by.

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